Open thou mine eyes

 

Open thou mine eyes

Open thou mine eyes, that I may behold wondrous things out of thy law.  Psalm 119:18 

But the natural man received not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned.

1st Corinthians 2:14.

 

To open their eyes, and to turn them from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan unto God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins, and inheritance among them which are sanctified by faith that is in me.

Acts 26:18

 

But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you.  John 14:26

 

Then opened he their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures, Luke 24:45

 

Spurgeon comments Open thou mine eyes. This is a part of the bountiful dealing which he has asked for; no bounty is greater than that which benefits our person, our soul, our mind, and benefits it is so important an organ as the eye. It is far better to have the eyes opened than to be placed amid the noblest prospects and remain blind to their beauty.

 

That l may behold wondrous things out of the law. Some men can perceive no wonders in the Gospel, but the psalmist felt sure that there were glorious things in the law: he had not half the Bible, but he prized it more than some men prize the whole. He felt that God had laid up great bounties in His word, and he begs for power to perceive, appreciate and enjoy the same. We need not so much that God should give us more benefits, as the ability to see what he has given.

 

The prayer implies a conscious darkness, a dimness of spiritual vision, a powerlessness to remove that defect, and a full assurance that God can remove it. It shows also that the writer knew that there were vast treasures in the Word which he had not yet fully seen, marvels which he had not yet beheld, mysteries which he had scarcely believed.

 

The Scriptures teem with marvels; the Bible is a wonderland. It not only relates miracles, but it is itself a world of wonders. Yet what are these to closed eyes? And what man can open his own eyes, since he is born blind? God, Himself must reveal revelation to each heart. Scripture needs opening, but not one half so much as our eyes do: the veil is not in the book but in our hearts.

 

What perfect precepts, what precious promises, what priceless privileges are neglected by us because we wander among them like blind men among the beauties of nature, and they are to us as a landscape shrouded in darkness!

 

The Psalmist had a measure of spiritual perception, or he would never have known that there were wondrous things to be seen, nor would he have prayed,

Open Thou mine eyes” but what he had seen made him long for a clearer and wider sight. This longing proved the genuineness of what he possessed, for it is a test mark of the true knowledge of God that it causes its possessor to thirst for deeper knowledge

 

In sum, the psalmist was asking God to take the veil off his eyes so that he might see the spiritual truth revealed by the Spirit. He was acknowledging his inability to observe spiritual truth without the Spirit’s illumination.

 

 

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